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The Legislative Report blog provides timely information on federal and state legislation and regulations and state trends as well as the myriad issues affecting the private club industry. A companion to CMAA's Legislative website, this resource should be your first stop for any information regarding legal, tax or legislative club-specific issues.

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OSHA’s Top Ten Most Cited Violations for 2017

(OSHA, Regulation) Permanent link

Preliminary data on the 2017 most cited violations by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was recently previewed at the 2017 National Safety Council’s Congress & Expo and published by Safety + Health magazine. Read More... (Login Required)


OSHA Announces Delay for July 1 Reporting Deadline

(OSHA, Regulation) Permanent link

OSHA Webpage

For clubs with 250 or more employees, the first reporting deadline for the updated OSHA reporting requirements was slated to be July 1, 2017. Under the final rule published in May 2016, businesses with 250 or more employees will now be required to electronically report injury and illness information to OSHA. This is the type of information that is currently maintained on OSHA Forms 300, 300A and 301. 

On May 17, OSHA posted the following information to its website “OSHA is not accepting electronic submissions of injury and illness logs at this time, and intends to propose extending the July 1, 2017 date by which certain employers are required to submit the information from their completed 2016 Form 300A electronically.” 

In related litigation, the rule is currently being challenged in two federal district court cases. Neither case is expected to be decided before the original July 1 deadline. 

Until there is a further announcement as to the new compliance date, clubs should continue to maintain their records and be prepared to comply with the new rule. 

Stay tuned for the latest information! 

OSHA Clarifies Employer’s Recordkeeping Obligations in New Rule

(OSHA) Permanent link

On Monday, December 19, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a final rule designed to clarify an employer's continuing obligation to make and maintain an accurate record of each recordable injury and illness. The final rule does not add any new compliance obligations for employers or change any existing reporting requirements. The final rule is slated to become effective January 18, 2017.

OSHA has long held the position that an employer’s duty to record an injury or illness continues for the full five-year required record-retention period, and this position has been upheld by the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission in cases dating back to 1993. This final rule comes in opposition to litigation dating from 2012 which reversed the Commission’s findings.


So what does this mean for a club? Generally, workplace violations are subject to citations and penalties for up to six months after the last instance of employee exposure to the unsafe condition. However, through this rule, OSHA is deeming failure to report the issue as an ongoing violation and thus employers could be fined up to five years from the date of the unreported injury or illness. In essence, OSHA is extending the statute of limitations from six months to five years.


For example, a worker suffers an injury at the club on January 1, 2017, while working in the kitchen that requires medical attention. The club fails to report it to OSHA and record it on OSHA 300 log. Under the new rule, the club could be fined and cited through January 1, 2022, for this omission and the unsafe conditions (if they existed). Previously, the club could have only been cited until July 1, 2017.


Given the ongoing Presidential transition, this rule could be reviewed by the incoming Administration as well as the new Congress when they return in January. Due to the timing of its issuance, it would be subject to the Congressional Review Act.  


OSHA Clarifies Employer’s Recordkeeping Obligations in New Rule

(OSHA) Permanent link

On Monday, December 19, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a final rule designed to clarify an employer's continuing obligation to make and maintain an accurate record of each recordable injury and illness. The final rule does not add any new compliance obligations for employers or change any existing reporting requirements. The final rule is slated to become effective January 18, 2017.

OSHA has long held the position that an employer’s duty to record an injury or illness continues for the full five-year required record-retention period, and this position has been upheld by the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission in cases dating back to 1993. This final rule comes in opposition to litigation dating from 2012 which reversed the Commission’s findings.


So what does this mean for a club? Generally, workplace violations are subject to citations and penalties for up to six months after the last instance of employee exposure to the unsafe condition. However, through this rule, OSHA is deeming failure to report the issue as an ongoing violation and thus employers could be fined up to five years from the date of the unreported injury or illness. In essence, OSHA is extending the statute of limitations from six months to five years.


For example, a worker suffers an injury at the club on January 1, 2017, while working in the kitchen that requires medical attention. The club fails to report it to OSHA and record it on OSHA 300 log. Under the new rule, the club could be fined and cited through January 1, 2022, for this omission and the unsafe conditions (if they existed). Previously, the club could have only been cited until July 1, 2017.


Given the ongoing Presidential transition, this rule could be reviewed by the incoming Administration as well as the new Congress when they return in January. Due to the timing of its issuance, it would be subject to the Congressional Review Act.  


Keep Your Employees Safe This Winter

(OSHA) Permanent link

Cold weather came early this year and many parts of the country have already experienced snow, ice and freezing rain. Despite the outside conditions, many club employees have to get their jobs done. Take time to remind your employees about cold weather hazards. Working in cold weather can be just as dangerous as working in excessively warm weather.  


Use these OSHA training resources to keep your employees safe this winter:



Share these resources with supervisors and employees at your club!


Keep Your Employees Safe This Winter

(OSHA) Permanent link

Cold weather came early this year and many parts of the country have already experienced snow, ice and freezing rain. Despite the outside conditions, many club employees have to get their jobs done. Take time to remind your employees about cold weather hazards. Working in cold weather can be just as dangerous as working in excessively warm weather.  


Use these OSHA training resources to keep your employees safe this winter:



Share these resources with supervisors and employees at your club!


OSHA Anti-Retaliation Regulations Effective December 1

(OSHA, Regulation) Permanent link

As we reported in May, OSHA has instituted new anti-retaliation protection provisions in conjunction with new reporting requirements. The rule prohibits all employers from discouraging workers from reporting a work-related injury or illness. 

The final rules regarding anti-retaliation were originally slated to become effective August 10, but were delayed until December 1, 2016, in an effort by OSHA to provide more compliance information to employers. 

The rule does not ban appropriate disciplinary, incentive or drug-testing programs. However, it allows OSHA to issue citations for retaliatory actions against workers when these programs are used to discourage workers from exercising their right to report workplace injuries and illnesses. Employers should review their current reporting procedures, programs and policies for elements that may result in retaliatory actions against an employee for reporting an injury or illness.

Review this helpful compliance information including sample scenarios to ensure your club’s safety programs are on target. 

  • Disciplinary Programs
  • Incentive Programs
  • Drug Testing Programs